9 Christians Shot to Death Execution-Style in Ambush

The Tuesday night incident is the latest in a series of deadly attacks carried out by suspected Fulani herdsmen on indigenous Christians.

Why aren’t they reporting these news reports on the murder of Christians?

Nine Christians were shot dead by suspected Fulani herdsmen in Nigeria’s central Plateau State on Tuesday night, Nov. 7, 2017, as they returned from a weekly village market.

Four more were injured during the incident in the Riyom Local Government Area (LGA), which happened at around 7:30 p.m.. Seven were killed instantly, two died later in hospital.

The victims’ names were:

Daniel Shom
Dachollom Shom
Emmanuel Gyang
Daniel Niri
Felix Gwom
Reuben Danbwang
Sunday Danbwang
Dagam Danbwang
Bitrus ‎Chunwang.

Some of them were part of the Church of Christ in Nigeria (COCIN), others the Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA).

According to a villager, Maria Joseph, who witnessed the attack, the victims were returning from the Makera market in a Volkswagen Golf when they were ambushed and shot at the Diyan junction near Gako village.

She added that the assailants were a combination of Fulani and soldiers, who later jumped into an Opel Vectra and zoomed off.

The driver of the Golf, Samson Dagwom, who pretended to be dead, said the attackers were all in tattered clothes and were haggard in appearance. While he was lying down, he said he heard them speaking in English and Fulfulde (the Fulani language).

Other local sources said some of the assailants were wearing army uniforms, but an army spokesman denied what he said were “unthinkable” allegations. Captain Umar Adam said the army had launched an investigation and would make public its findings as soon as possible.
Tension and emotions are high in Diyan, Gako and other neighboring communities, as they mourn the death of their loved ones.

The nine victims were buried in their village, named Rim, in a mass grave Wednesday afternoon (8 November).‎

CAN and others condemn killings

The state chairman of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Rev. Soja Bewarang, sent his condolences to the families of those killed and called on security officials to “keep a closer and diligent watchful eye on Riyom, Barakin Ladi [the neighboring LGA] and other hotspots in the state”. He also advised the federal government to do more to prevent further attacks on Christian communities in the state by Fulani herdsmen, a call echoed by a state Assembly member.

“We have been under siege. Some weeks back, Fulani herdsmen complained that one of them was killed, which we didn’t know about, and they said they were going to attack this community, and now they have taken the laws into their hands and truly attacked,” said Daniel Dem, representing the Riyom constituency in the state’s House of Assembly.

“If somebody comes out clearly before the STF [Special task Force] and said he is going to attack a community and the people were later ambushed after a week and killed, the person who gave the threat should be arrested and interrogated. The leaders of Fulani in Riyom should be arrested and interrogated by the Defense Headquarters. Enough of these mass killings!”

The Plateau State Governor, Simon Lalong, said the killings were an assault on people living in their own ancestral lands.

A federal lawmaker representing Riyom LGA, Istifanus Gyang, said the attack was likely motivated by a quest for land occupation and territorial annexation, which he said was being carried out with “ruthless banditry and brutal slaughter”.

According to the Chairman of Riyom LGA, Emmanuel Jugul, most of the people in the local communities of Mahanga and Gweba have been displaced from their homes, after they were forcefully taken over by Fulanis. He called on the federal government to intervene to avert a national crisis.

“You can imagine that there are villages that indigenous [people] cannot go,” he said. “Today, a native of Riyom cannot go Mahanga because they will be killed by the Fulani people. Fulanis are saying that they have captured the place. Are they fighting [a] jihad? Why should they be talking about capturing communities?”

The Tuesday night incident is the latest in a series of deadly attacks carried out by suspected Fulani herdsmen on communities dominated by indigenous Christians.

The recent upsurge has shattered the relative calm regained by Plateau State, which has witnessed the deadliest sectarian violence in Nigeria’s recent history.

But many denounced the passivity of the army. On October 14, attackers believed to be Fulani herdsmen descended on one village, burnt over 30 houses and destroyed farmlands, despite a dusk-to-dawn curfew imposed by the governor. Moreover, a member of the community said that following the imposition of the curfew, the soldiers had gone around the houses in the community and mopped up all the weapons the villagers had to defend themselves, thereby making them even more vulnerable to attackers.

A recent report, published by the International Crisis Group (ICG), said the response to the crisis at both federal and state levels has been poor.

“The government typically deploys the federally controlled police, and sometimes the army, to areas reporting attacks or clashes. These forces, poorly deployed in rural areas, often lack logistics for rapid response, especially across difficult terrain,” the report said.


Tennessee Grandfather Banned from Reading Bible on Public Sidewalk

Question is: Would they have stopped a Muslim from reading the Quran?

A man in Tennessee who was stopped from reading his Bible on a public sidewalk due to a city ordinance is arguing that the ordinance violates his religious freedom rights.

CBN News reports that Paul Johnson is being supported in his argument by First Liberty Institute and the Center for Religious Expression, who sent a letter to Sweetwater, Tennessee city officials on Johnson’s behalf.

Johnson himself expressed his thoughts on the situation: “I was shocked that a city had a law banning anyone from reading the Bible on a public sidewalk without the city’s permission. All I want to do is tell people about the love of Jesus by reading my Bible, but I was worried I might be arrested if I tried.”

The letter sent to city officials requests that the ordinance be repealed because it is “overbroad and unconstitutional,” as well as “outdated.”

“Because he can’t go into the mission field and go to all the world to preach the Gospel, he does that anywhere nearby that he can,” said Chelsey Youman, counsel for First Liberty, in an interview with CBN News.

The letter also notifies city officials that Johnson attempted to get a permit to preach and read the Bible in public, but that he was arbitrarily denied.

The letter concludes by demanding that Johnson be allowed “to peacefully share his religious beliefs at future events without imposing the unconstitutional permit requirement for ‘demonstrations’ on him.”


Chinese Christians Forced to Replace Posters of Jesus with President Xi

Chinese Christians Forced to Replace Posters of Jesus with President Xi

Christians in a village in southeastern China have reportedly been asked to replace their posters of Jesus Christ with posters and photos of Chinese President Xi Jinping if they want relief from poverty and illness.

According to the South China Morning Post, Chinese government officials are encouraging the change.

Xi has publicly said that he is working to end poverty by 2020. That work includes government visits to Christian families to encourage them to follow the Communist Party policies and solve their problems.

“Many poor households have plunged into poverty because of illness in the family. Some resorted to believing in Jesus to cure their illnesses,” said Qi Yan, chairman of the Huangjinbu people’s congress.

“But we tried to tell them that getting ill is a physical thing and that the people who can really help them are the Communist Party and General Secretary Xi,” he added.

The Huangjinbu township gave more than 1,000 portraits of Xi to families.

Officials deny that they suggested religious icons would need to be removed.

But residents have said that officials are calling for the removal of religious artifacts.

“They all have their belief and, of course, they didn’t want to take them down. But there is no way out. If they don’t agree to do so, they won’t be given their quota from the poverty-relief fund,” the resident said.

In October, Xi secured his rule for another term after the National Party Congress did not select a successor to Xi.


9 Christians Shot to Death Execution-Style in Ambush

The Tuesday night incident is the latest in a series of deadly attacks carried out by suspected Fulani herdsmen on indigenous Christians.
The Tuesday night incident is the latest in a series of deadly attacks carried out by suspected Fulani herdsmen on indigenous Christians. (World Watch Monitor)

 

Nine Christians were shot dead by suspected Fulani herdsmen in Nigeria’s central Plateau State on Tuesday night, Nov. 7, 2017, as they returned from a weekly village market.

Four more were injured during the incident in the Riyom Local Government Area (LGA), which happened at around 7:30 p.m.  Seven were killed instantly, two died later in hospital.

The victims’ names were:

Daniel Shom
Dachollom Shom
Emmanuel Gyang
Daniel Niri
Felix Gwom
Reuben Danbwang
Sunday Danbwang
Dagam Danbwang
Bitrus ‎Chunwang.

Some of them were part of the Church of Christ in Nigeria (COCIN), others the Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA).

According to a villager, Maria Joseph, who witnessed the attack, the victims were returning from the Makera market in a Volkswagen Golf when they were ambushed and shot at the Diyan junction near Gako village.

She added that the assailants were a combination of Fulani and soldiers, who later jumped into an Opel Vectra and zoomed off.

The driver of the Golf, Samson Dagwom, who pretended to be dead, said the attackers were all in tattered clothes and were haggard in appearance. While he was lying down, he said he heard them speaking in English and Fulfulde (the Fulani language).

Other local sources said some of the assailants were wearing army uniforms, but an army spokesman denied what he said were “unthinkable” allegations. Captain Umar Adam said the army had launched an investigation and would make public its findings as soon as possible.
Tension and emotions are high in Diyan, Gako and other neighboring communities, as they mourn the death of their loved ones.

The nine victims were buried in their village, named Rim, in a mass grave Wednesday afternoon (8 November).‎

CAN and others condemn killings

The state chairman of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Rev. Soja Bewarang, sent his condolences to the families of those killed and called on security officials to “keep a closer and diligent watchful eye on Riyom, Barakin Ladi [the neighboring LGA] and other hotspots in the state”. He also advised the federal government to do more to prevent further attacks on Christian communities in the state by Fulani herdsmen, a call echoed by a state Assembly member.

“We have been under siege. Some weeks back, Fulani herdsmen complained that one of them was killed, which we didn’t know about, and they said they were going to attack this community, and now they have taken the laws into their hands and truly attacked,” said Daniel Dem, representing the Riyom constituency in the state’s House of Assembly.

“If somebody comes out clearly before the STF [Special Task Force] and said he is going to attack a community and the people were later ambushed after a week and killed, the person who gave the threat should be arrested and interrogated. The leaders of Fulani in Riyom should be arrested and interrogated by the Defense Headquarters. Enough of these mass killings!”

The Plateau State Governor, Simon Lalong, said the killings were an assault on people living in their own ancestral lands.

A federal lawmaker representing Riyom LGA, Istifanus Gyang, said the attack was likely motivated by a quest for land occupation and territorial annexation, which he said was being carried out with “ruthless banditry and brutal slaughter”.

According to the Chairman of Riyom LGA, Emmanuel Jugul, most of the people in the local communities of Mahanga and Gweba have been displaced from their homes, after they were forcefully taken over by Fulanis. He called on the federal government to intervene to avert a national crisis.

“You can imagine that there are villages that indigenous [people] cannot go,” he said. “Today, a native of Riyom cannot go Mahanga because they will be killed by the Fulani people. Fulanis are saying that they have captured the place. Are they fighting [a] jihad? Why should they be talking about capturing communities?”

The Tuesday night incident is the latest in a series of deadly attacks carried out by suspected Fulani herdsmen on communities dominated by indigenous Christians.

The recent upsurge has shattered the relative calm regained by Plateau State, which has witnessed the deadliest sectarian violence in Nigeria’s recent history.

But many denounced the passivity of the army. On October 14, attackers believed to be Fulani herdsmen descended on one village, burnt over 30 houses and destroyed farmlands, despite a dusk-to-dawn curfew imposed by the governor. Moreover, a member of the community said that following the imposition of the curfew, the soldiers had gone around the houses in the community and mopped up all the weapons the villagers had to defend themselves, thereby making them even more vulnerable to attackers.

A recent report, published by the International Crisis Group (ICG), said the response to the crisis at both federal and state levels has been poor.

“The government typically deploys the federally controlled police, and sometimes the army, to areas reporting attacks or clashes. These forces, poorly deployed in rural areas, often lack logistics for rapid response, especially across difficult terrain,” the report said.


Egypt Pentecostal church reopened after 22 years seen by some as gesture to US

After 22 years the doors of the Pentecostal church in Minya City are reopened. (Photo: World Watch Monitor)

A Pentecostal church in Minya City, Egypt, reopened its doors on Sunday (29 October) after 22 years without a permit, a move some see as a goodwill gesture from the government ahead of the visit of US Vice President Mike Pence.

Pence announced last week that he hoped to visit Israel and Egypt in late December, at the same time as he announced the US government planned to bypass an “ineffective” UN and send aid directly to persecuted Christians in the Middle East. Egyptian President Abdel Fattah-el Sisi also recently met with a delegation of Christians from the US in which he “stressed the importance of fighting Islamic terrorism and protecting religious freedom”, according to CBN News.

In recent weeks Coptic Christians in Egypt’s Minya governorate have seen a number of their churches closed by police following harassments and attacks by Muslim villagers.

The affected church communities have been forced to find alternative places of worship, which often means travelling to a neighbouring village.

22 years without a permit

In the case of the reopened “Bethel Church” in Minya, assistant church leader Rev. Boulos Moussa Salib told World Watch Monitor “the congregation is very happy that they can now return to their church” and that they are grateful to the government for finally granting them a permit.

The reopening of the "Bethel Church" in Minya City was attended by government and church representatives. (Photo: World Watch Monitor)
The reopening of the “Bethel Church” in Minya City was attended by government and church representatives. (Photo: World Watch Monitor)

The opening ceremony was attended by parliamentary representatives and church leaders. But on the same day the church reopened, Anba Macarius, Bishop of Minya, issued a statement criticizing the recent flurry of church closures across Minya.

“It is as though worship is a crime that Copts have to be penalized for,” he said.

He also called for justice and the rule of law. “When Copts are attacked, the local official response is invariably disillusioning: churches are closed and Copts pressured into accepting injustice,” he said.

The Bishop has issued earlier statements in which he has expressed disillusionment “at the failure of negotiations with security authorities in Minya to reopen churches closed by security order” because churches either lacked security approval or were considered offensive to Muslims and therefore a threat to social harmony.

In an attempt to deal with the issue, the government ratified a church-construction law in 2016, and last month a cabinet committee started work on the legalisation of unlicensed churches.

Despite this, the Bishop said in his latest statement that he still fears the government will give in to the demands of the Islamists who object to churches being built in Egypt.

Christian MPs, rights workers and researchers have condemned the proposed law as an attempt to pacify Christians in the name of public order, while not effecting real change.

But Minya’s governor, Essam el-Bedawi, responded to Bishop Macarius’s statement by saying his administration wanted to collaborate with the bishopric and that it did not discriminate on religious grounds. He said that between September 2016 and September 2017, his administration had processed and approved 32 applications by the diocese.


British missionary killed in Nigeria, 3 others freed

One of four British missionaries kidnapped in Nigeria three weeks ago has been killed, according to the Foreign Office, but the other three have been released.

Ian Squire was killed following the kidnap on October 14. However, David and Shirley Donovan and Alanna Carson have all returned home safely.

Delta State is in the south of Nigeria and is known as ‘the big heart of the nation’.Wikipedia

A statement from their families reported by the Daily Telegraph said: ‘We are grateful for the support received by the British High Commission, and help from the Nigerian authorities in negotiating their release. We are delighted and relieved that Alanna, David and Shirley have returned home safely. Our thoughts are now with the family and friends of Ian as we come to terms with his sad death.’

The four were taken in a remote part of Delta state, where they were delivering aid to villages with a medical charity called New Foundations.

The area has a history of separatist movements and has suffered a spate of kidnappings recently linked to the central government’s crackdown on Islamist milita.

Kidnapping for ransom is a common problem in parts of Nigeria and high-profile individuals and Westerners are often the target. A number of foreigners have, in the last few years, been kidnapped in the Niger Delta region, which holds most of the country’s crude oil – the country’s economic mainstay.

Chief Theo Fakama, from the local Enukorowa community, told the Agence France-Presse news agency that villagers were saddened by the kidnapping because the victims had ‘brought succour to residents of the community for the past three years’.


At Least 26 Killed in Texas Church Shooting

At Least 26 Killed in Texas Church Shooting

at least 26 people were killed and many more were injured in a deadly shooting at a Texas church on Sunday, November 5.

According to CBN News, a gunman entered First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas about 11:20 a.m. local time and opened fire on those gathered for Sunday worship.

The victims included children as well as elderly members of the congregation. The church’s pastor, Frank Pomeroy, lost his 14-year-old daughter.

Police have identified the suspect as 26-year-old Devin Kelley. Kelley reportedly fled the church after a local resident attempted to fight back. He was found dead in his vehicle after crashing it near the county line. He suffered a gunshot wound, but it is unclear whether this wound was self-inflicted or incurred while in a chase with police.

Officials said they are looking into the case and discerning Kelley’s possible motives. Currently, they do not have any evidence that Kelley was linked to any terrorist organization.

Following the church shooting, Texas Mayor Greg Abbott said in a press conference, “There are 26 lives that have been lost. We don’t know if that number will rise or not, all we know is that’s too many, and this will be a long, suffering mourning for those in pain. We ask for God’s comfort, for God’s guidance and for God’s healing for all those who are suffering. As governor, I ask for every mom and dad at home tonight, that you put your arm around your kid and give your kid a big hug and let them know how much you love them knowing that we support each other.”

President Trump also commented on the shooting from Japan, his current stop on his tour of Asia:

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and the families in today’s horrible attack,” Trump said. “It happened at a place of sacred worship. The pain and grief we all feel cannot begin to imagine the suffering of those who lost loved ones.”

“In a time of crisis Americans will do what we do best: we pull together and join hands and lock arms and through the tears and sadness we stand strong,” he added.

 

Photo: Law enforcement officials gather near First Baptist Church following a shooting on November 5, 2017 in Sutherland Springs, Texas. At least 26 people were reportedly killed and 24 injured when a gunman, identified as Devin P. Kelley, 26, allegedly entered the church during a service and opened fire.

 


Hindu Extremists Beat Pastor Unconscious in Southern India after ‘Miraculous’ Conversions

Pastor Banothu Sevya after attack by Hindu extremists in Telangana state, India. (Morning Star News courtesy of family)

HYDERABADIndia (Morning Star News) – Weeks after a pastor led five families to faith in Christ in southern India, masked men on motorbikes intercepted him on his way home from worship and tried to kill him, sources said.

Pastor Banothu Sevya, 26, was in a coma for 48 hours after the drunken Hindu extremists beat him in Govindapuram, on the outskirts of Jamandlapalli village in Telangana state, last month. They had threatened him twice before, he said.

“But I didn’t pay attention, knowing that when the Lord’s work is taken up, there will be hurdles, and I never complained the police officials,” Pastor Sevya told Morning Star News.

In their prior threats, the assailants had accused him of fraudulent or forcible conversion, asking how he lured Banjara tribal people and what he told them, he said.

“I told them, ‘I only share the gospel, that we are all sinners, and this world is to come to an end some day. Only Jesus Christ can cleanse us from the sins. He was crucified for our sake, and rose again to present us eternal life. I ask them if there is life in the rocks, trees and water – why worship them?’”

Pastor Sevya said he told them he spoke to every person individually when they came to ask him about Christ.

“Most Banjaras say they get afflicted by evil spirits,” he said. “They want them to be sent away. Some want to be healed, some need the Lord’s help in their pursuits to get educated. I share the gospel and pray for them. We witnessed the Lord doing miracles among them. He does not forsake anyone who comes to Him.”

Pastor Sevya first preached Christ in Jangi Thanda, a village in Govindapuram, at the request of a relative. When five families came to Christ, he had been as astonished as anyone.

“I too belong to the same Banjara tribal community, and it is not possible by human strength to separate them from idolatry – they have a number of gods enshrined in rocks, trees, water and the like,” he said. “The five families left everything behind and have been walking in the Light since they invited Jesus Christ into their hearts. It is a miracle.”

On the evening of Oct. 5, more than 60 villagers had gathered at his relative’s house to study the Bible and worship in a service that lasted until 9 p.m., he said. As he rode home on a motorcycle, he noticed the masked men following him.

“I didn’t see where they came from,” he said. “They pushed me off the bike and started beating me with sticks and kicking me. My nose and ears were bleeding. I lost my consciousness.”

His wife, Banothu Anusha, told Morning Star News she received a phone call at 11 p.m. informing her that her husband was injured and had been admitted to the Government Hospital in Mahabubabad.

“I immediately rushed to the hospital with my father-in-law,” she said. “I was told my husband was found unconscious lying on the road by passengers of a State Road Transport Bus. They saw about 10 men fleeing from the scene, and one man lying unconscious as the bus approached.”

The assailants are from Jangi Thanda, where Pastor Sevya had been evangelizing the past few months, she said.

“They attempted to murder him,” she said. “Doctors in Mahabubabad and Warangal districts told me he would die, and my father and father-in-law arranged for 100,000 rupees [US$1,545] and shifted him to a private hospital in Hyderabad.”

Doctors told her he had blood clots in the cerebral area, brain coordination problems, injury to his eye and a damaged eardrum, she said.

The pastor said he was alive only by the grace of God.

“I forgive the youth who attacked, and I am praying for them,” he said.

His wife filed a written complaint with police in the Mahabubabad Rural Police Station, but they did not register a First Information Report, she told Morning Star News.

Pastor Sevya said police claimed they would continue to investigate, but that they offered little hope as the assailants were masked and he could not remember most of the assault, having slipped into a coma.

He pastors a 60-member church in Sri Raja Thanda, a tribal hamlet in Mahabubabad District where he resides with his family. The pastor requested prayer for completion of a church building there and strengthening of the congregation’s faith, and his wife requested prayer for his recovery.

Since Prime Minister Narendra Modi took power in May 2014, the hostile tone of his National Democratic Alliance government, led by the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), against non-Hindus has emboldened Hindu extremists in several parts of the country to attack Christians, religious rights advocates say.

India ranked 15th on Christian support organization Open Doors’ 2017 World Watch List of the countries where Christians experience the most persecution.

 

Pro-life president thrown out by students’ union

A pro-life student leader at University College Dublin (UCD) has been impeached four months into her term – a move she described as intolerant and regressive.

Students’ union president Katie Ascough took an executive decision to remove abortion information from the student guidebooks after being advised that unsolicited information was illegal.

It was then replaced with phone numbers and websites for agencies that allowed students to obtain the same information without breaking the law.

‘Sad day’

However, this decision caused a backlash from pro-abortion campaigners who called for her to be impeached, leading to a vote where students backed her removal by 69 per cent to 31 per cent.

Speaking after the vote’s outcome, Ascough said it was a “sad day” for herself and for UCD.

“Universities should be a place of freedom of speech, freedom of thought and freedom of association”.

Respect

She called on universities to allow for “room to respect those with different opinions” as it is “critical to true debate and intellectual freedom”.

“Although I believe my impeachment is a regressive step”, she added, “I hope that the light it has shone on the intolerance of some may allow us to build better campus communities, where tolerance, inclusivity and fairness are truly valued”.

David Quinn, Director of the pro-life and pro-family group the Iona Institute, criticised pro-abortion campaigners for shutting down free speech.

Intolerant

Quinn said those who campaigned to impeach Ascough “have revealed how utterly intolerant they are of anyone they disagree with, right to the point of overturning election results that don’t go their way”.

“At the end of the day, Ascough was impeached because she was elected to lead a body that is left-wing and pro-choice to its core, and someone with her viewpoint could not be tolerated.”

“She was democratically elected, and nothing she did justified her impeachment, which was done without anything remotely resembling due process. This was a purge. Nothing less.”

Abortion referendum

In 2018, the Republic of Ireland will vote on the country’s constitutional protections for the unborn.

The Eighth Amendment currently pledges to “defend and vindicate” the equal right to life of the unborn and the mother, “as far as practicable”.

 


How Can Christians Guard Against Imbalance between Faith and Politics?

This last election cycle, and really every election cycle, kind of demonstrates that there are Christians who are probably not concerned enough about the political process. There are Christians that are kind of appropriately concerned and there are Christians that are overly invested, in the political process. I think one of the greatest guards is to remember that we are those who have a dual citizenship, and our citizenship is in heaven and Christ, and we are in the (Book of) Peter language “pilgrims, and sojourners, and travelers through this barren land, that is not our home. We are to render unto Caesar the things that belong to Caesar, and render to God the things that belong to God.” I think we want to avoid not taking these things seriously on the one hand, but not avoid being over-invested on the other hand.

Honestly, Christians in the United States, we don’t live in communism or socialism on the dictatorship, so we do have the opportunity to vote. I believe there’s some stewardship with that voting. I do believe we’re voting and participating kind of in a broken system, so I encourage scripture Christians to realize they’re not going to open the scripture and see a candidate space. And they’re not going to open the scripture and see the platform of the Democratic, nor the Republican party.

You’re going to have to do some thinking and some engagement, and there’s some contextualization to how you engage in a broken, fallen political system. I don’t mean broken, just in a sense of the United States is categorized by congressional gridlock and all that. I mean broken as in a sense of, our politics is composed of broken people; because all of humanity is fallen. I mean it in that broad sense. There’s no perfect political system.

I would encourage Christians to approach it with the appropriate level of consideration. I’m not over-invested. I’m not under-invested. I realize that the mission of the church and the mission of me as a Christ-honoring husband and father, those kinds of things don’t change every four years or two years, on the election cycle. The great commission is the same. And so, in one sense, the congregation of followers of Christ, they’re doing the same things regardless of what’s going around us with Caesar and other governmental influences.

Finally, I would just say, I just don’t think there’s anything in the political process that is worth losing the fellowship of the Body of Christ. In this last election cycle, 2016, I think hurt the unity of the Body of Christ of many Bible-believing Christians in the United States, and I think we’ll have consequences for our missiological effectiveness for a good while going forward. That has happened. We can’t undo that, and so let’s just press toward the mark of the high calling of God. We have to avoid being over-invested.