Apostolic News

UK Churches reporting many Baptized and filled with the Holy Ghost

Pastor W. Ellis reported that last Saturday we baptised five people, four from the Aylesbury Church and one from High Wycombe. Yesterday three people were filled with the Holy Ghost in High Wycombe. We thank the Lord for Hisl saving grace.

 

Pastor J Mpofu  Reports  We give glory to God for 9 Souls water Baptised in the Name Of The Lord Sunday  All the Glory to God

Atheism Should Be Part of Religious Education Classes in Britain, Report Says

Religious education classes in British public schools would be broadened to include atheism, secularism and humanism under a proposal by a commission that has studied the issue for two years.

The Commission on Religious Education issued its report last month, asserting that such changes are needed in a fast-changing and pluralistic world. Under the commission’s proposal, the name of the subject would be changed from “Religious Education” to “Religion and Worldviews.” It would be a required subject.

“Young people today are growing up in a world where there is increasing awareness of the diversity of religious and non-religious worldviews, and they will need to live and work well with people with very different worldviews from themselves,” the report says. “One need only glance at a newspaper to know that it is impossible fully to understand the world without understanding worldviews – both religious and non-religious.”

It added, “This is an essential area of study if pupils are to be well prepared for life in a world where controversy over such matters is pervasive and where many people lack the knowledge to make their own informed decisions.”

The subject would teach about Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism but also “non-religious worldviews and concepts including Humanism, secularism, atheism and agnosticism”

The Very Rev Dr. John Hall, who chaired the commission, told The Telegraph the subject needed a “fresh start.”

“Life in Britain, indeed life in our world, is very different from life in the 1970s when Religious Education began to include other world religions and beliefs besides Christianity,” Hall said.

But some said the changes go too far.

“This report is not so much an attempt to improve RE as to fundamentally change its character,” a spokesman for the Catholic Education Service told the newspaper. “The proposed name change to include ‘worldviews’ means that the scope of the subject is now so wide and nondescript that it would potentially lose all academic value and integrity. As we have always maintained, the quality of Religious Education is not improved by teaching less religion.”

Death Toll in Indonesia Climbs to More than 1,300, Includes 34 Bible Camp Children

Death Toll in Indonesia Climbs to More than 1,300, Includes 34 Bible Camp Children

Authorities found some 34 bodies of children in an Indonesian church after an earthquake and tsunami pummeled an Indonesian island Friday.

Red Cross spokeswoman Aulia Arriani said the children were attending a Christian bible camp when they were killed. Officials expect to find more bodies as the death toll continues to rise.

According to reports, more than 1,300 people died in the disasters.

Volunteers in the area are working on digging a mass grave for the dead.

Meanwhile in Palu, a military plan carrying supplies was unable to land because of crowds at the airport.

“There was a fear of the crowd mobbing the plane,” a representative for an aid organization said. “People are so desperate for aid.”

Other reports say that stores have been “cleaned out” of supplies and there has also been some looting.

“Security on the ground is not great,” the aid worker said. “There’s no power, there’s limited food and no access to clean water … Our biggest concern is the security of our staff and making sure that their supplies will be going to the most needy.”

Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman for Indonesia’s National Disaster Mitigation Agency, said tsunami detectors buoys were not working, but a tsunami warning was still issued.

But many in Palu did not receive the warning because of power outages.

Nugroho also added that about 50,000 people have been displaced from their homes.

Yenni Suryani, of Catholic Relief Services, said power was still out “almost everywhere” and staff is having trouble reaching affected areas.

According to reports, the earthquake was a 7.5 magnitude quake and tsunami waves were as high as 20 feet.

Rebels in Burma Detain More than 90 Christian Leaders, Shut Down More Churches

YANGONBurma (Morning Star News) – After shutting down at least 10 churches in early September, ethnic Wa rebels in eastern Burma (Myanmar) have closed dozens of other churches and detained 92 Christian leaders and 42 students in a bid to curtail Christian activities, sources said.

The United Wa State Army (UWSA) in late September detained the Christian leaders and students in territory it controls in Shan state, leaders of the Lahu Baptist Convention said in statement released on Tuesday (Sept. 25). Some students were also forced to serve as UWSA soldiers, according to the statement.

The 52 churches in Mong Pauk Township have been shut down, and the UWSA destroyed three church buildings and removed all Christian symbols such as crosses, according to the ethnic Lahu Christian leaders. A few religious schools also have been shut down.

Earlier in September, the UWSA troops shut down at least 10 churches, including six belonging to the Kachin Baptist Convention (KBC).

“The Wa officials instructed Christians in Mong Pauk not even to worship at home these days,” a local Christian leader based in Keng Tung told Morning Star News on condition of anonymity. “So, some Christian members dare not to live in Mong Pauk any longer. They came to stay in Keng Tung town as they are fearful.”

Wa soldiers are holding arrested Christian leaders and students in Mong Maw town, a stronghold base of the Wa rebels, said Tat Jack, a local resident whose relatives are detained.

“My uncle is a preacher,” Tat Jack told Morning Star News. “He lives at a village nearby the Wa rebel base, Panghsang city. He and his son were detained in early September. But we are not allowed to visit them. We also heard that many members of the Christian community there are detained.”

Christian leaders have said the militants, who predominantly follow tribal religions, seek to reduce the spread of Christianity. Wa rebel spokesperson Nyi Rang told The Irrawaddy, a Yangon-based new outlet, that the UWSA had detained the Christian leaders because there were “extremists” among them.

A UWSA statement released on Sept. 13 stated that all church buildings constructed after 1992 would be destroyed or shut down, as they were built without permission from the UWSA’s leaders.

On a UWSA-run television program, it was stated that the UWSA has arrested and interrogated the religious leaders for violating organization regulations and laws prohibiting foreigners to serve as religious leaders in Wa-controlled areas. It also accused some detainees of forcing ethnic people to convert to Christianity.

Dr. M. Hkawng, chairman of an ethnic Kachin political party, the Kachin National Congress, has said that missionaries improve the lives of ethnic minorities in the Wa region, educating them and enabling them to travel to overseas to Japan, the United States and other countries to pursue their education.

Although most of the population in Wa territory worships spirits or Nats, there are also Buddhists as well as Christian communities such as Baptists and Roman Catholics. Many area members of ethnic minority groups, such as the Ahkar, Lahu and Kachin, as well as the Wa, are Christians, sources said.

Some Christians suspect Chinese authorities are behind the recent aggression against Christians.

The UWSA is the military wing of the United Wa State Party (UWSP), the de facto ruling party of the area. It was formed after the collapse of the armed wing of the Communist Party of Burma in 1989.

The UWSA announced its territory as the Wa State Government Special Administrative Region on Jan. 1, 2009, and although the government of Burma does not officially recognize its sovereignty, the Burmese military has fought alongside the UWSA against Shan nationalist militias.

Though de facto independent from Burma, the Wa state officially recognizes Burma’s sovereignty over all of its territory, and in 2013 the two parties signed a peace deal.

Burma is about 80 percent Buddhist and 9 percent Christian.

The country is ranked 24th on Christian support organization Open Doors’ 2018 World Watch List of the countries where it is most difficult to be a Christian.

Four Children, Grandmother among 17 Christians Slain in Attack by Muslim Herdsmen in Nigeria

Cynthia Kogi, 22, killed in Sept. 27 attack by Mulslim Fulani herdsmen in Jos, Nigeria. (Morning Star News)

Cynthia Kogi, 22, killed in Sept. 27 attack by Muslim Fulani herdsmen in Jos, Nigeria. (Morning Star News)

JOSNigeria (Morning Star News) – Armed Fulani herdsmen accompanied by militants in Nigerian army uniforms killed 17 Christians in their homes in the heart of Jos, north-central Nigeria, on Thursday (Sept. 27), including four children, area sources said.

At about 7:30 p.m. in an area known as Rukuba Road, the assailants broke into one home shooting randomly and killed 14 members of one family, including 15-year-old Ishaya Kogi, 17-year-old Jonathan Kogi, Cynthia Kogi, 22, and Lucky Kogi, 25, their uncle told Morning Star News.

Two of Lucky Kogi’s children, 3-year-old Majesty Lucky and Blessing Lucky, 14, were also killed in the assault, he said.

“When the Fulani herdsmen came, they shot into the house randomly, breaking and forcing their way into rooms shooting defenseless women and children and anyone in sight,” the mournful Rogu Audu, who lost his mother and two of his own children in the attack, told Morning Star News.

The 50-year-old member of ECWA church, Blue Zinc, Rukuba Road, Jos, said his mother, Kande Audu, 75, was killed in the assault, along with two of his children – Ruth Rogu, 18, and Dorcas Rugu, 20. The two had gone to their grandparents’ house to take them dinner, he said.

The attack took place close to the Nigerian army military cantonment, Rukuba Barracks, in Jos. Surviving family members told Morning Star News that the Fulani herdsmen, armed with both firearms and machetes, were accompanied by Nigerian army soldiers.

“The Fulani herdsmen came from the Wild Life Park, which shares a border with our community,” Audu said. “The park is located in the southern flank of Rukuba Road and has rocky hills, which provided the attackers with cover to enable them to invade our community.”

Ruth Rogu, 18, killed in Muslim Fulani herdsmen attack in Jos on Sept. 27, 2018. (Morning Star News)

Ruth Rogu, 18, killed in Muslim Fulani herdsmen attack in Jos on Sept. 27, 2018. (Morning Star News)

The four children of one family slain were those of Kogi Audu, 47, also killed. She was the wife of Rogu Audu’s brother. Her fifth child, Blessing Kogi, 22, was injured in the slaughter and was receiving treatment in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos, he said.

Two other female relatives, Azumi Gado, 20, and Ladi Rigi, 22, were on a visit to the house at the time of the attack and killed, Audu said.

Rogu Audu also told Morning Star News that armed Fulani herdsmen attacked the home of his uncle, 65-year-old Sunday Moru, killing Moru’s granddaughter, Blessing Sunday, 18, and her fiancé, 23-year-old Monday. The couple was visiting him.

All those killed were members of the local Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA) congregation, he said.

Area resident Daniel Kadiya, 60, told Morning Star News that the herdsmen also attacked his son’s house, where three of his grandchildren were struck with machetes. Wounded were Redzie Yakubu, 14, Patience Yakubu, 8, and Philip Yakubu, 5, he said.

“They had machete cuts and are currently receiving treatment at the Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos,” Kadiya told Morning Star News. “Redzie was cut on her head, Patience was cut on her right hand, while Philip was cut on the face and hands.”

His son and daughter-in-law were not at home at the time of the attack.

Rogu Audu said that the armed Fulani herdsmen on the same day killed three other ECWA members in the area, members of the Yoruba ethnic group, but their names were not readily available as residents said relatives had moved their property out of their house the following afternoon.

Attacks by Fulani militant herdsmen have increased in the past three years, according to Jubilee Campaign.

“Since the beginning of 2018, the violence is again spiking with reported deaths attributed to Fulani militant herdsmen climbing to at least 1,860 people, with an additional 300 plus victims claimed by Boko Haram,” Jubilee reported earlier this year. “Again, most of these victims are Christians from small ethnic minority communities in the northeastern states.”

Christians make up 51.3 percent of Nigeria’s population, while Muslims living primarily in the north and middle belt account for 45 percent.

Nigeria ranked 14th on Open Doors’ 2018 World Watch List of countries where Christians suffer the most persecution.